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Update November 2:
To learn more about the 2020–2021 academic year please see our financial support page and our expanded FAQ page. You can also read more about the evolving policies and other key questions related to MIT’s COVID-19 response.

For students: Student hours

There are certain guidelines around how and when you can work as a student.

We encourage you to not work more than 20 hours a week during the school year—and not to have work interfere with any of your scheduled classes01 To be clear, this means you should not work during hours you are supposed to be in class.   or exams. This allows you to be an active participant in your schoolwork and your job. However, you may work 40 hours a week during school breaks, summer, and IAP.

It may seem obvious, but you only receive wages for the hours that you actually work. If your weekly schedule is affected by vacations, holidays, or sickness, you may want to talk to your supervisor to see if you can make up the time.

Breaks and meals

If you work more than three hours, you are entitled to a 15-minute paid break.

If you work more than six hours, you are required to take a 30-minute meal break. This break is unpaid and is in addition to the 15-minute paid break. The 30-minute meal break requirement is based on Massachusetts state law.

Work-study

Per federal regulations, students participating in a federal work-study program are not permitted to miss class time in order to perform their federal work-study duties.

Work and graduation

December Graduation

You are eligible to work until the last day of finals in the fall term.

June Graduation

You are eligible to work until the last day of finals in the spring term.

Students with any other graduation date should contact us to determine the last day they are eligible to work.

  1. To be clear, this means you should not work during hours you are supposed to be in class. back to text